Our Presence in the World

House of Bonsai has been growing bonsai for the public since 1990. With our family owned & operated business being open for over 30 years, you can find our bonsai trees in many places; especially in California. Some of these are well known by our customers and some are quite unexpected! 

Please take a look at this list of places and times that our presence has been felt in the world; in no particular order below.

 

>   The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens (aka The Huntington):

The Huntington hosts more than 800,000 visitors each year from the United States and all around the world, who come to enjoy the gardens and galleries, conduct research, and learn from the collections. 

Visitors to the Bonsai Collection are treated to an ever-changing display of one of the largest and finest public masterpiece bonsai collections in the United States. Started in 1968 with personal trees donated by the late Bob Watson, The Huntington’s bonsai holdings now number in the many hundreds, representing a wide variety of different species, styles and sizes; from centuries-old twisted junipers to majestic pines, stately elm forests, and much more.

Many of its younger bonsai trees showcased in their Bonsai Collection actually originate from House of Bonsai from many years ago!

No two visits to the Bonsai Collection are ever exactly the same; as trees are rotated throughout the year to highlight seasonal features such as flowers, foliage color and fruit. Occasionally, bonsai trees that encounter pests or disease are also removed from public display to enable treatment. While visitors may see about 75 bonsai on any given day, these displays represent only a portion of the overall collection. Today, this blended collection represents the long tradition of bonsai in Southern California and serves as a living legacy to our bonsai pioneers, as well as to our contemporary bonsai visionaries. Since 1990, The Huntington has served as the Southern California site for the Golden State Bonsai Federation (GSBF)'s collection (more on them in the next entry).

 

 

>   Golden State Bonsai Federation’s Bonsai-A-Thon Annual Bonsai Convention/Public Show:

The Golden State Bonsai Federation (GSBF) is one of the premier and largest bonsai organizations in the United States that actively provides services and activities promoting the wonderful art of bonsai. GSBF is made up of member clubs in California and affiliate clubs in the adjoining States.

Its Annual Convention events gives “bonsai people” an opportunity to watch bonsai masters at work; to participate in hands-on instructor led workshops; to shop for plants, tools, pots, and other materials at the bazaar; compete in various contests, and to share in the friendly companionship of other bonsai enthusiasts. They are open to the public for others to participate and learn more about bonsai hands on and in person.

House of Bonsai has been a key vendor at GSBF's Bonsai-A-Thon for many years. We have proudly been a promoter of bonsai trees and supplies to the public that visit the event and wish to take home for themselves.

GSBF is working hard to maintain two permanent bonsai collections in Northern and Southern California – Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt and Bonsai Collection at The Huntington Botanical Gardens.

 


>   'Memoirs of a Geisha' (2005) Movie/Film:

'Memoirs of a Geisha' is a historical fiction novel book by American author Arthur Golden, first published in 1997. The novel, told in first person perspective, tells the story of a fictional geisha working in Kyoto, Japan, before, during and after World War II, and ends with her being relocated to New York City. 

In 2005, a film version was released; adapted from the novel. Filming was primarily done in California, and in some locations in Kyoto, Japan. The film was nominated for and won numerous awards, including nominations for six Academy Awards, three of which—Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design—it had won.

To assist on its production, roughly $10,000 of bonsai trees and supplies were purchased from House of Bonsai to be used as props and set decorations for many scenes. After filming was completed, many of the trees were given to cast and crew as living memorabilia.

 


>   California State University, Long Beach (CSULB)'s Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden:

The Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden is located on the campus of California State University, Long Beach. The Japanese Garden is a living museum, a place of learning, art, and culture for all who enter its gates. Visit the locale to feed their playful koi, stroll the winding pathways, view the Tea House, or reflect at the Zen Garden. 

Some of their large Pine and Juniper Garden Bonsai Trees were purchased from House of Bonsai to further add to their botanical beauty over the years. They are located on the path edges surrounding the koi pond.

 

 

>   Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)'s The Pavilion for Japanese Art:

The Pavilion for Japanese Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) is a location that is exclusively devoted to Japanese art spanning from prehistory to the present. It is the last structure and only major public building designed by famous architect Bruce Goff. It opened on LACMA's campus on September 25, 1988. 

For its 30th birthday, LACMA has decided to give the Pavilion for Japanese Art a comprehensive makeover. Thanks to a generous grant from the County of Los Angeles, the pavilion area will undergo much-needed renovation and repairs. It has been closed to the public since February 5, 2018 with a planned closure for two years. However, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is unknown at this time on when they will be able to reopen it to the public.

Before the renovation news were announced, House of Bonsai was in charge of doing the major maintenance pruning twice a year to upkeep all of the extra large Japanese Black Pine garden bonsai trees planted all around the entrance of the pavilion building. We had the honor to say that we helped the bonsai stay gorgeous for the museum's visitors year-round for many years.

 

 

(!) As we remember more of where our bonsai trees have shown up in the world, we'll add to this page for your reference. (!)